Tarot Meaning
The 78 Tarot cards, their meaning in divination, and free online reading.

By Stefan Stenudd
Stefan Stenudd
About me
I'm a Swedish writer. In addition to fiction, I've written books about Tarot, astrology and other metaphysical traditions. I'm also a historian of ideas, researching the thought patterns in creation myths. My personal website: stenudd.com

Tarot Meaning & Online Reading

Tarot Online Reading
Free Celtic Cross card reading.


Major Arcana
The 22 Tarot trump cards and their meanings.


Minor Arcana
The 56 suited Tarot cards and their meanings.


The Celtic Cross
The most famous and used Tarot card divination spread explained.


Tarot Card Decks
Some of the Tarot designs through the centuries.


The Rider-Waite Tarot
The most famous Tarot card deck.


Tarot vs. Playing Cards
The same ancestry but evolving for different purposes.


What to Make of It
Is Tarot divination accurate, and if so - how?


Tarot Archetypes
The symbolic ingredients in the cards.


Tarot Speaks to You
The cards mean what they mean to you.


Tarot Copyright
The Tarot in the public domain.


Tarot Unfolded
My book on the Tarot and its symbolic imagery.


Contact
How to get in touch with me.





Major Arcana
Click the image to get the card reading.

The Fool Tarot Card The Magician Tarot Card The High Priestess Tarot Card The Empress Tarot Card The Emperor Tarot Card The Hierophant Tarot Card The Lovers Tarot Card The Chariot Tarot Card Strength Tarot Card The Hermit Tarot Card Wheel of Fortune Tarot Card Justice Tarot Card The Hanged Man Tarot Card Death Tarot Card Temperance Tarot Card The Devil Tarot Card The Tower Tarot Card The Star Tarot Card The Moon Tarot Card The Sun Tarot Card Judgement Tarot Card The World Tarot Card


Complete Horoscope
Complete Horoscope
How predictions are done by classical astrology and the complete horoscope, with many examples.


I Ching Online
I Ching Online
The 64 hexa­grams of the Chinese classic I Ching and what they mean in divination. Try it online for free.


Book by Stefan Stenudd:

Your Health in Your Horoscope, by Stefan Stenudd.

Your Health in Your Horoscope
This book shows you what your horoscope says about your health, according to the old tradition of medical astrology. You learn what the planets, the Zodiac signs and the other ingredients of the horoscope reveal about many health issues. Click the image to see the book (and Kindle ebook) at Amazon.


Life Energy Encyclopedia, by Stefan Stenudd.
Life Energy Encyclopedia
Qi, prana, spirit, ruach, pneuma, and many other life forces around the world explained and compared, by Stefan Stenudd. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.




Justice

Justice

The Meaning of the Justice
Major Arcana Tarot Card in Readings


The Tarot Justice card meaning in a nutshell:
Justice without blindfold
is not always fair.


     The Justice of the Tarot is not blind. There's the sword representing the sharp firmness of the law, and the scales by which to judge the actions of men, as carried by every image of Justitia. But the Tarot Justice has no blindfold, the guarantee that all people are treated as equals before the law. Unfortunately, that has often proven to be closer to the truth about justice.

     The blindfold on the personification of justice appeared at the end of the 15th century, as on the 1543 statue by Hans Gieng below, which may be the first known representation of blindfolded justice:


Justitia, by Hans Gieng 1543.
Justitia. Statue in Bern by Hans Gieng, 1543. Justitia was not blindfolded until at the end of the 15th century.


     So, the Tarot Justice card indicates that the system of justice is hazardous even to the innocent. You need not only to obey the law, but give the impression of doing so. That's not always easy. How can you prove that you are a law-abiding citizen? A basic principle of justice is that we are innocent until proven guilty, but in reality it has happened far too often through history that we've been regarded as guilty until we were able to prove our innocence - beyond any reasonable doubt.

     The Tarot Justice card, then, refers to the judgmental attitude - the one expecting and seeing faults in others and not in a hurry to reconsider or forgive. But if you stand the test, you are acquitted, most definitely, and everything will be fine. You may even receive respect.

     Notice also that on the Tarot Justice card image, the sword is held high, as if to strike, whereas the scales are held low. That's an indication of values between them in the mind of this figure of justice: Fairness in trial is of less importance than the order imposed by the might of the law. So, beware of justice in the shape suggested by this Tarot card.

     Even if you come out of it free of any accusations, you can't be sure that it's because of justice being done or just because you pleased the court. That's a victory with a bitter taste to it and a remaining sense of uncertainty.

     The other great uncertainty with justice, implied by the Tarot Justice card, is the elusive nature of truth. As Pilate asked rhetorically: What is truth? We are rarely sure of having found it, extremely rarely all of it and nothing but it. So, who can judge, really?

     Still, Justice on the picture of this Tarot card shows no hint of humility or hesitation. Not much benefit of a doubt is to be expected. A person with this characteristic needs to learn moderation and consideration. We all err. That goes for judges, too.

     Compare the other Tarot card about justice: Judgement.


A. E. Waite's Texts
About the Tarot Justice Card

11. Justice. That the Tarot, though it is of all reasonable antiquity, is not of time immemorial, is shewn by this card, which could have been presented in a much more archaic manner. Those, however, who have gifts of discernment in matters of this kind will not need to be told that age is in no sense of the essence of the consideration; the Rite of Closing the Lodge in the Third Craft Grade of Masonry may belong to the late eighteenth century, but the fact signifies nothing; it is still the summary of all the instituted and official Mysteries. The female figure of the eleventh card is said to be Astraea, who personified the same virtue and is represented by the same symbols. This goddess notwithstanding, and notwithstanding the vulgarian Cupid, the Tarot is not of Roman mythology, or of Greek either. Its presentation of justice is supposed to be one of the four cardinal virtues included in the sequence of Greater Arcana; but, as it so happens, the fourth emblem is wanting, and it became necessary for the commentators to discover it at all costs. They did what it was possible to do, and yet the laws of research have never succeeded in extricating the missing Persephone under the form of Prudence. Court de Gebelin attempted to solve the difficulty by a tour de force, and believed that he had extracted what he wanted from the symbol of the Hanged Man - wherein he deceived himself. The Tarot has, therefore, its justice, its Temperance also and its Fortitude, but - owing to a curious omission - it does not offer us any type of Prudence, though it may be admitted that, in some respects, the isolation of the Hermit, pursuing a solitary path by the light of his own lamp, gives, to those who can receive it, a certain high counsel in respect of the via prudentiae.


The Inner Symbolism of the Tarot Justice Card

As this card follows the traditional symbolism and carries above all its obvious meanings, there is little to say regarding it outside the few considerations collected in the first part, to which the reader is referred.

It will be seen, however, that the figure is seated between pillars, like the High Priestess, and on this account it seems desirable to indicate that the moral principle which deals unto every man according to his works - while, of course, it is in strict analogy with higher things; - differs in its essence from the spiritual justice which is involved in the idea of election. The latter belongs to a mysterious order of Providence, in virtue of which it is possible for certain men to conceive the idea of dedication to the highest things. The operation of this is like the breathing of the Spirit where it wills, and we have no canon of criticism or ground of explanation concerning it. It is analogous to the possession of the fairy gifts and the high gifts and the gracious gifts of the poet: we have them or have not, and their presence is as much a mystery as their absence. The law of Justice is not however involved by either alternative. In conclusion, the pillars of Justice open into one world and the pillars of the High Priestess into another.


Divinatory Meaning of the Tarot Justice Card

Equity, rightness, probity, executive; triumph of the deserving side in law. Reversed: Law in all its depart­ments, legal complications, bigotry, bias, excessive severity.



The Tarot Major Arcana

  1. The Magician

  2. The High Priestess

  3. The Empress

  4. The Emperor

  5. The Hierophant

  6. The Lovers

  7. The Chariot

  8. Strength

  9. The Hermit

  10. Wheel of Fortune

  11. Justice

  12. The Hanged Man

  13. Death

  14. Temperance

  15. The Devil

  16. The Tower

  17. The Star

  18. The Moon

  19. The Sun

  20. Judgement

  21. The World

  22. The Fool


The Book

Tarot Unfolded, by Stefan Stenudd.
Tarot Unfolded

This book by Stefan Stenudd presents an imag­inative reading of the divination cards, which is the most appropriate for the Tarot since it consists of symbolic images. Several spreads are introduced, as well as the meanings of all the 78 cards and their pictures. Also, it gives many examples of symbolic and allegorical imagery within and beyond the Tarot. This book will help you find your own intuitive way of making inspired Tarot card readings. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.